Professor Longhair, Big Chief, originator (at New Orleans)

Professor Longhair, Big Chief, originator (at New Orleans)

song - dance - merriment (at New Orleans)

song - dance - merriment (at New Orleans)

Dimitri From Paris, “My Tribute to Frankie Knuckles" mix (April 2, 2014) - Sunday Music! There was lots to say this week about Frankie Knuckles’ passing, and I was among the many hacks who was asked to put down some thoughts, so I did. One of the things I kept wanting to come back to was the spiritual nature of his endeavors and that he was comfortable framing them as such: not just his perennial use of the church as a metaphor to describe the energy of the Warehouse, but the deep serene soulfulness of the music and remixes he made upon his return to New York. Todd at RBMA wrote about how Chicago was the right place and time for Knuckles in terms of his ability to contribute to the flow of DJ/dance culture. I wonder if the city’s “Capital of the Heartland” nature didn’t also help shape the sentiments of his music, the aspects of hope and salvation and gospel that became its permanent fixture. (And, because it was being done by Frankie, in turn forever became part of house’s DNA.) When I was younger and heard Knuckles play, these were the qualities of his sets that I liked the least — gimme more drum-machine minimalism and more Jack, I thought, and in a club, I still generally feel this way. Yet the other, more functionally human side of house music, the one its revivalists constantly treat as a cliche (and thus, very rarely get as right as the crackling beat), is the one I increasingly listen for, searching what the music is grounded in. These are the sounds that make up most of Dimitri’s Frankie tribute mix, alongside the expected classics. It’s Sunday house music with a feeling perched somewhere between an infinite sadness and not-quite joy — saudade, the Brazilians call it — and it is a notion that every great dance-floor congregation possesses. 

Sounds of Blackness, “The Pressure (Pt. 1) (Frankie Knuckles classic mix)” (Perspective 1991) - “…to help me fight the pressure of the world.” RIP Frankie Knuckles (1955-2014)

Jeff Mills starring as the teenage Wizard. Supposedly from Cheeks nightclub, Eight Mile Road, Detroit; definitely from around 1984. A wonderful time capsule. [h/t Gavin Russom]

Mike McGonigal aka DJ Yeti, 'Buked & Scorned Gospel Hour (XRAY FM/KXRY) - Sunday Music! Yeti Magazine publisher, McGonigal has spent the last few years also being involved in the release of some great gospel music excavations and reissues. Recently he’s started doing a weekly radio show on Portland’s KXRY, and posting it (temporarily) on his Soundcloud page pre-dated broadcast. The result is essential weekly listening at Chez Raspberry, one crystal-clear definition of “Sunday Music!”. Above is the March 30th show, featuring the following expertly chosen tributes to the spirit and the soulful life (special mention of Bruce Haack’s vocoderized/early electronic gospel paean): Daniel Johnston, “A Recorded Message” / Rev. Louis Overstreet, “I’m On My Way” / Brother & Sister W B Grate, “Power Is In The Heart Of Man. pt 1” / Rev. Chambers, “Me And The Devil” / The Jubilee Gospel Team, “You’ve Got To Meet Your God Somewhere” / Bill Porter & Howard Seratt, “Jesus Hold My Hand’ / Elder A. Johnson, “God Don’t Like It” / Daniel Johnston, “Lord Give Me Hope” / Famous L. Renfroe, “Believe” / B. Haack, “When Mothers of Salem” / House of God Harmonizers, “He’s Mine” / Six Voices of Zion of Columbia, SC, “God Said Call Me” / Lillian Holmes & Madam Wesley Mae Walker, “I Love The Name Jesus” / E.C. And Orna Ball, “God Be With You Till We Meet Again” / Southern Revivalists Of N.O, “I’m Bound For Higher Ground” / The Radio Four, “What’Cha Gonna Do?” / Daniel Johnston, “Where the Soul of Man” / Brother & Sister W B Grate, “Power Is In The Heart Of Man, pt 2”

Kraftwerk + Neu! = Neuwerk! (Rockplast 1970) Florian and Ralf and Klaus, 50 minutes of motorik drone improv. Not quite the metallic power of the Schneider/Rother/Dinger “Kraftwerk Live 1971” bootleg of a few years ago, but weird and wonderful nevertheless, and dig the “Trans-Europe Express” opening motif straight outta Florian’s flute around 17 minutes. [h/t Henry Owings y Dan Selzer]

Funkadelic feat. Moodyman, “Sloppy Cosmic” (KDJ 2014) - A collaboration for the ages —part cover, part re-edit, part new parts over old stems — set to be dropping into a friendly neighborhood 12” retailer any day now. And when it does, instant single of the Month. (h/t RA’s Feed)

Frak, “Alice in Acidland” (Börft 1993). Deep Swedish ACIIEIIEIIEIIEIIED circa the first rave wars. New fresh reissued batch on the way. (Also: the internal soundtrack to a weekend of being stuck with a feverish toddler who does not want anything that will make her feel better.)

setlistschematics:

Dark Star, 4/24/72. (18 in. x 24 in.) 43 mins.

setlistschematics:

Dark Star, 4/24/72. (18 in. x 24 in.) 43 mins.